Alina Hubarenko

Alina Hubarenko is a Ukrainian-German artist who was born in Kyiv in 1991 and raised near Kassel, Germany. They developed an interest in art at a young age and initially pursued studies at the Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture in Ukraine. However, after a year, they made the decision to switch to a medical university. Despite this change, they continued to pursue artistic education through self-study, benefiting from the guidance and knowledge of contemporary artists. Their life has been divided between two countries and two professions.

Alina Hubarenko, “Estrella del Mar” 2022

Artrepreneur: In what ways does your artwork reflect your personal experiences or worldview?

Alina Hubarenko: The whole creation process, from idea to the result is based on my personal experience, my own mind reflections, my values. I don’t think one can make good art without being involved in the subject of the artwork and without being honest with oneself and the viewer.

ATP: Can you share an instance where a viewer interpreted your work differently than you had intended? How did you respond to their interpretation?

AH: Maybe not entirely differently, but the viewer always sees something own, sometimes what I didn’t really intended to express. For example, there’s always an interesting discussion around the theme of the paperboats. Some people perceive them as childish (in a good way), the others have put a deep story comparing the paperboats to a phoenix. It’s incredibly interesting and fascinating for me and actually I really hope that every viewer can put an own, personal interpretation behind my artworks. Without it my art would be a monologue.

Alina Hubarenko, “Wild Caribbean” 2021

ATP: What emotions do you aim to evoke through your paintings?

AH: The emotions are always results from thoughts, often not perceived or subconscious. Actually, I hope that while watching my artworks people don’t think at all. Something similar to the Buddhist state of enlightenment. Or at least just letting the sorrows, doubts, anxiety go and being in the moment. It’s called mindfulness, but actually the mind is very clear in this state. And one feels very peaceful.

I know that it is a high goal and I’m really glad when people just remember their happy holidays or their love for the sea. These are often very fulfilling positive emotions.

Actually, even when the viewer just stops for a second and thinks of my art “Wow, that’s beautiful”, I consider I achieved what I’ve intended. Even one molecule of serotonin in viewer’s brain makes my art meaningful. 

Alina Hubarenko, “Milky Wave” 2022

ATP: How does the process of creating art affect your mood or mindset? Do you find it therapeutic or challenging?

AH: Definitely therapeutic. It begins with the moment when I’m making references for my artworks. The presence at the seaside is kind of a healing, purifying experience for me. I try to keep this emotions during painting, this process puts me in a kind of meditative state.

During lifetime crisis, like the war in Ukraine (I’m born in Kyiw), it also helped me a lot to process my emotions as I’m always deep in my thoughts reflecting on them. This resulted in a series of black and white water paintings.

But of course, when I’m working under pressure for a certain project or exhibition, or I’m not happy with the result, I experience frustration, stress and other human emotions. This is not therapeutic but it’s part of the life.

ATP: How do you strike a balance between realism and abstraction in your paintings? What drives your stylistic choices?

AH: This is not very difficult when painting water. Water causes very abstract and chaotic disruptions in a natural way. Sometimes I feel like painting mandalas and they result in realistic water paintings.

It should work vice versa on the viewer: Once captured by the hyperrealistic waves, the eyes get caught in lines. By following them I want the viewer to let the mind wander.

Alina Hubarenko, “Portrait of a Wave” 2021

ATP: How do you strike a balance between realism and abstraction in your paintings? What drives your stylistic choices?

AH: This is not very difficult when painting water. Water causes very abstract and chaotic disruptions in a natural way. Sometimes I feel like painting mandalas and they result in realistic water paintings.
It should work vice versa on the viewer: Once captured by the hyperrealistic waves, the eyes get caught in lines. By following them I want the viewer to let the mind wander.

To view more of Alina’s work please visit their profile.